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Grammar Grappler #10: Chester Drawers

This weeks’ blog spot is short and sweet.

How do you pronounce this piece of furniture?

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.

.

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Answer: chest of drawers

 

As a child, I called it a “chester drawers.” Fortunately, someone kindly corrected me before I entered college.

However, I am not alone. So many people to this day say “chester drawers,” even as adults. Someone close to me (and older than I) called it a “chester drawers” last week. Even a furniture store rep pronounced it that way not too long ago. I used to believe it was a Southern tendency, but I have discovered in my travels that other regions of the country go furniture shopping for a bed, night stand, dresser—and “chester drawers.”

Which other mispronunciations come to mind from childhood?

 

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

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