Tag Archive for: email writing

What Are The Rules For Ellipses?

What Are The Rules For Ellipses?

2024 Grammar-for-Grownups Top 10

 

Number 7: Dot Dot Dot …

 

How many of you are my dot dot dot friends? 

 

Bad example: …..I will be leaving for Amory……I won’t be in the office tomorrow…if I miss you today….maybe we can talk next week…..

 

Bad example: Give me a minute……seriously……how soon do you need this???

 

Allow me to share a recent question from a reader. Question: What are the rules for ellipses? I work with people who use them a lot—I mean, sometimes multiple times in the same sentence.

 

Answer: The rule for ellipses is simple. Ellipses indicate omissions in quoted material. Please note ellipses consist of three dots, not 17 dots. You could have four dots at the end of the sentence because the fourth dot is the period. However, people tend to use the dot dot dots to express “and so on and so on and so on” or “et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.” These are incorrect uses of ellipses.

Sometimes people insert ellipses to let their thoughts trail off into the wild blue yonder. Most of the time, though, writers use them when they are uncertain of which punctuation mark they are supposed to use. Is it a comma? Is this a good place for a dash? I don’t know, so I’ll just dot dot dot it and keep on going! Again, this is incorrect use of ellipses.

 

We tend to see sentences like those above in emails. Most writers would never print the above-punctuated sentences on formal company letterhead. For some reason, we tend to be a bit lax in our email punctuation, especially with ellipses. However, email lasts forever. We need to follow the same good grammar and punctuation guidelines with emailed correspondence as we would with more formal documentation. Let’s strive to use ellipses within a quotation to represent omissions of words, sentences, or even paragraphs. 

 

How many of you will join me in limiting the incorrect use of ellipses? Are you willing to take the “No More Ellipses Pledge”? When it comes to using dot dot dots to fill in the gaps of sentences, can you nip it in the bud? Please respond in the comments below, and I’ll be your biggest cheerleader.

 

To customize a keynote or professional development session that will have your audience laughing and learning, contact Mandi Stanley.

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

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Prefer Performance to Chronology in Your Résumé

It’s Interview Time: What’s the One Detail Most Interviewees Forget?

Wacky Word of the Week: Purge this Particular Word

 

sticky notes

Sticky Notes to the Rescue

Currently I’m facilitating an eight-week Business Writing Specialty Certificate Course for the CAPstone program through IAAP (International Association of Administrative Professionals).

During Week Four’s session on weeding out wasted words, one of the participants sent
me this sticky note reminder she now uses as she composes and edits her emails. Sticky
notes to the rescue!

What about you? Do you have sticky notes pasted prominently around your work area?
Please take a photo and share it with us here. We all need reminders—and I can’t wait to
see some of the notes you write to yourself.

 

To customize a keynote or professional development session that will have your audience laughing and learning, contact Mandi Stanley.

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

You might also like:

Prefer Performance to Chronology in Your Résumé

It’s Interview Time: What’s the One Detail Most Interviewees Forget?

Wacky Word of the Week: Purge this Particular Word

Top Ten List of Executives’ Email Pet Peeves

Each year, Stanley Seminars, LLC, surveys leaders within various organizations and associations regarding the essentials of leadership and business acumen. For the executive communication section, we created a Top Ten List of executives’ email pet peeves. We asked leaders about bad email habits they are noticing in the workplace. We dove into what their coworkers sometimes do with email that could cause them—and thereby the entire organization—to appear less than professional.

This most recent list is revealing, and number 10 garners much discussion during my Write It So They Read It workshops:

10. Replying All with one-word comments such as “Got it” or “Thanks” or “Sounds good”

9. TYPING IN ALL CAPS

8. Using BCC: the “tattletale of email”

7.  Not using a salutation and simply jumping directly to the message with no greeting

6.  Careless grammar, punctuation, and spelling

5.  Using emojis in professional emails

4.  Using texting shortcuts in an email

3.  Using just a one-word subject line—or worse, leaving it empty

2.  Signing off on an email with “Warm regards” or “Best” or even “Love”

1.  Forgetting an attachment

 

What about you? What on this list surprises you? And what would you add to it?

 

To customize a keynote or professional development session that will have your audience laughing and learning, contact Mandi Stanley.

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

You might also like:

Prefer Performance to Chronology in Your Résumé

It’s Interview Time: What’s the One Detail Most Interviewees Forget?

Wacky Word of the Week: Purge this Particular Word

email technique

One RED HOT Email Technique for the New Year

Earlier this year I surveyed C-suite executives by asking this question: Name a business writing best practice that has served you well in your career. 

Read more

email writing skills

Email Writing Skills for Customer Service Professionals

Lorman Education Services has invited me to present on the topic of essential email writing skills for customer service professionals at an upcoming live webinar. As my guest, you are eligible for 50 percent off the registration fee.

 

I’m thrilled about partnering with Lorman and offering these outcome-oriented objectives during this 30-minute live webinar:

 

  • Identify the top seven credibility-robbing mistakes we make with customer service emails—and how to avoid them 

 

  • Answer commonly asked questions about when—and if—you should use acronyms, jargon, and even emojis

 

  • Never forget an attachment again

 

  • Discover the four-step approach to composing a thorough email

 

  • Understand the importance of a complete email subject line—and how to write one consistently every time 

 

  • Learn how to draft customer emails and responses that don’t sound canned 

 

  • Make sure your customer-facing emails are absolutely error free with no embarrassing typos or mistakes

    Join us September 16, 2022
    1:00PM EST – 1:30PM EST

    Register online here
    Call: 866-352-9539
    Discount code: S4444442
    Priority code: 15999

    I look forward to having you in attendance and providing you with the latest information on essential email writing skills.

 

To customize a webinar, keynote, or professional development session that will have your audience laughing and learning, contact Mandi Stanley.

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

You might also like:

The Order of Email Writing

It’s Interview Time: What’s the One Detail Most Interviewees Forget?

Wacky Word of the Week: Purge this Particular Word

Photo by Daria Nepriakhina on Unsplash

order of email writing

The Order of Email Writing

We interrupt our regular blog posting to recount this super fun day of learning with PRCA (Public Relations Council of Alabama) to discuss the order of email writing. Read more

Grammar Grappler #24: Why Sign it “Sincerely”?

A couple of weeks ago, I posted a guideline on how to capitalize complimentary closes for business letters and emails. When your complimentary close is more than one word, you don’t capitalize the second word. For instance: Read more

Grammar Grappler #22: Sincerely yours or Sincerely Yours

This week’s post is a quick read, but we’re using our summer theme of “Grammar Grapplers” to answer readers’ questions. Recently, I’ve received a couple of versions of this question. What do you think? Please choose the correct response. Read more

Grammar Grappler #17: The Tattletale of Email

When do you use bcc: appropriately? Read more

Grammar Grappler #16: Is it still a carbon copy?

What does cc: actually stand for when referring to emails? Read more