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What If You Forget to Mention Something During Your Presentation?

It’s a good idea to remind yourself that your audience probably hasn’t seen a written copy of your speech. They won’t know if you accidentally forget a story, unless you backtrack and decide to tell them. They probably won’t even realize if you leave out a key point.

For example, in No-Panic Presentation Skills seminars, I place a small piece of chocolate wrapped in gold paper at each seat. The candy has a specific purpose, and I explain it about 10 minutes into my presentation.

At a recent women’s conference in Louisiana, however, I totally forgot to tell them about the chocolate, and I didn’t realize it until the end when I noticed no one had touched it. It’s usually gobbled up half way through the program.

How could I forget such a key element in a presentation I conduct 30 times a year? Of course, no one in my audience that day knew any better. They didn’t think twice about the chocolate. They probably just gathered it up with their learning guides and were happy to have a little snack on the way home. I kicked myself, but I didn’t regress and mention it to them. I never said a word.

 

To customize a keynote or professional development session that will have your audience laughing and learning, contact Mandi Stanley.

 

Certified Speaking Professional Mandi Stanley works with business leaders who want to boost their professional image by becoming better speakers and writers through interactive high-content keynotes, breakout sessions, workshops, technical writing seminars, and fun proofreading classes. 

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